Tag Archives: good deals

The NoMad — Reserve Red Wines by the Glass

As I wrote yesterday, The NoMad (my reviews herehere (at the rooftop), and here), made news recently with its list of “reserve wines by the glass.”  The NoMad uses a high-tech system called a Coravin, which lets you pour a glass of wine out of a bottle without removing the cork.  As a result, the restaurant (or you, if you want to shell out a few hundred bucks) can serve wine by the glass without exposing the wine remaining in the bottle to oxygen.  Yesterday, I did a little analysis on white wines; today I am doing the same for their reds.

The basic theory here is that the Coravin makes wines by the glass affordable — but how affordable, exactly?  Just like last time, the first three columns are straight from The NoMad’s wine list.  The next column is the average price for that bottle of wine on www.wine-searcher.com.  The NoMad says one “serving” is about a quarter bottle, so I divided the wine-searcher price by four to get a price-per-serving at retail prices.   Finally, I calculated the NoMad-to-retail ratio:  the lower the ratio, the better the deal. (Once more, the wine list is at the bottom of the post.)

Have you ever had a wine by the glass (or bottle) that you thought was a good value?  What was it and where did you have it?

 

VARIETAL DESCRIPTION NOMAD PRICE PER GLASS WINE-SEARCHER AVERAGE “RETAIL” PRICE PER GLASS NOMAD-TO-RETAIL RATIO
PINOT NOIR ALAIN HUDELOT-NOELLAT, LES BEAUMONTS, 1ER CRU, VOSNEROMANÉE, FRANCE 2005 $80 $200 $50 1.6
DOMAINE DUJAC, GRAND CRU, CHARMES-CHAMBERTIN, FRANCE 2007 $100 $199 $50 2.0
DOMAINE COMTE GEORGES DE VOGÜÉ, CHAMBOLLE-MUSIGNY, FRANCE 1993 $120 $290 $73 1.7
GRENACHE CLOS DU MONT OLIVET, CHÂTEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE, FRANCE 1985 $75 n/a* n/a n/a
CHÂTEAU RAYAS, CHÂTEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE, FRANCE 1997 $140 $329 $82 1.7
MONTEPULCIANO MONTEPULCIANO, EMIDIO PEPE, ABRUZZO, ITALY 1983 $60 $190 $48 1.3
CABERNET FRANC CATHERINE & PIERRE BRETON, BEAUMONT, CHINON, FRANCE 1976 $40 $85 $21 1.9
NEBBIOLO BARTOLO MASCARELLO, BAROLO, ITALY 2004 $50 $136 $34 1.5
AR.PE.PE., ROCCE ROSSE, SASSELLA SUPERIORE RISERVA, VALTELLINA, ITALY 1999 $40 $63 $16 2.5
PRODUTTORI DEL BARBARESCO, BARBARESCO, ITALY 1985 $60 $78 $20 3.1
TEMPRANILLO LOPEZ DE HEREDIA, VIÑA BOSCONIA, GRAN RESERVA, RIOJA, SPAIN 1976 $110 $365 $91 1.2
MOURVÈDRE CHÂTEAU DE PIBARNON, BANDOL, FRANCE 1990 $65 $140** $35 1.9
SYRAH JAMET, CÔTE RÔTIE, FRANCE 2006 $50 $238 $60 0.8
JEAN-LOUIS CHAVE, HERMITAGE, FRANCE 2010 $120 $478 $120 1.0
CABERNET SAUVIGNON MAYACAMAS, NAPA VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 1986 $75 $172 $43 1.7
TENUTO SAN GUIDO, SASSICAIA, TUSCANY, ITALY 1999 $75 $230 $58 1.3

*Not on wine-searcher.com.
**Estimated from wine-searcher graph.

As you can see there are a couple of neat values here.  The Jean-Louis Chave is priced at just about “par” — a 1:1 ratio of NoMad to retail.  But you still have to drop $120 on a glass.  The other interesting option is the Jamet.  It is listed on wine-searcher at $238, though this is a recent price spike from a historical average of about $150.  So perhaps The NoMad stocked up on a few bottles of the Jamet before the jump and can afford to sell it basically at retail.  (The bottle goes for $250.  And although wine-searcher lists and average price of $238, the only place I found actually selling it had it for $375, though oddly they list it as a “future” even though it’s almost a decade old.)  I like Syrah generally, so I would probably spring for the Jamet if I were back.  I would avoid the Barbaresco, not just because of the 3-to-1 ratio but because $80 is a price I might reasonably pay for a bottle to drink at home (whereas I probably wouldn’t pay $300 or $500).  The Tempranillo looks like a good value, too, though I’m not sure I could make myself pay $110 for a glass.

So there you have it, my analysis of the reserve wines at The NoMad.  I’m going to see if I can put up a calculator on the website as well, so you can do some calculations for yourself if/when the wine lists change.

The NoMad’s list of reserve wines by the glass is below. (Return to the body of the post.)

NoMad’s Reserve Wines by the Glass

The NoMad — Reserve White Wines by the Glass

The NoMad (my reviews here, here (at the rooftop), and here) made news recently with its list of “reserve wines by the glass.”  The NoMad uses a high-tech system called a Coravin, which lets you pour a glass of wine out of a bottle without removing the cork.  As a result, the restaurant (or you, if you want to shell out a few hundred bucks) can serve wine by the glass without exposing the wine remaining in the bottle to oxygen.  That means The NoMad’s list of “reserve” wines by the glass includes lots of bottles you wouldn’t otherwise find — generally, bottles that have aged 10-15 years or more, and that would costs hundreds of dollars if you bought them by the bottle.   Continue reading