Category Archives: General Information

The NoMad — Reserve Red Wines by the Glass

As I wrote yesterday, The NoMad (my reviews herehere (at the rooftop), and here), made news recently with its list of “reserve wines by the glass.”  The NoMad uses a high-tech system called a Coravin, which lets you pour a glass of wine out of a bottle without removing the cork.  As a result, the restaurant (or you, if you want to shell out a few hundred bucks) can serve wine by the glass without exposing the wine remaining in the bottle to oxygen.  Yesterday, I did a little analysis on white wines; today I am doing the same for their reds.

The basic theory here is that the Coravin makes wines by the glass affordable — but how affordable, exactly?  Just like last time, the first three columns are straight from The NoMad’s wine list.  The next column is the average price for that bottle of wine on www.wine-searcher.com.  The NoMad says one “serving” is about a quarter bottle, so I divided the wine-searcher price by four to get a price-per-serving at retail prices.   Finally, I calculated the NoMad-to-retail ratio:  the lower the ratio, the better the deal. (Once more, the wine list is at the bottom of the post.)

Have you ever had a wine by the glass (or bottle) that you thought was a good value?  What was it and where did you have it?

 

VARIETAL DESCRIPTION NOMAD PRICE PER GLASS WINE-SEARCHER AVERAGE “RETAIL” PRICE PER GLASS NOMAD-TO-RETAIL RATIO
PINOT NOIR ALAIN HUDELOT-NOELLAT, LES BEAUMONTS, 1ER CRU, VOSNEROMANÉE, FRANCE 2005 $80 $200 $50 1.6
DOMAINE DUJAC, GRAND CRU, CHARMES-CHAMBERTIN, FRANCE 2007 $100 $199 $50 2.0
DOMAINE COMTE GEORGES DE VOGÜÉ, CHAMBOLLE-MUSIGNY, FRANCE 1993 $120 $290 $73 1.7
GRENACHE CLOS DU MONT OLIVET, CHÂTEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE, FRANCE 1985 $75 n/a* n/a n/a
CHÂTEAU RAYAS, CHÂTEAUNEUF-DU-PAPE, FRANCE 1997 $140 $329 $82 1.7
MONTEPULCIANO MONTEPULCIANO, EMIDIO PEPE, ABRUZZO, ITALY 1983 $60 $190 $48 1.3
CABERNET FRANC CATHERINE & PIERRE BRETON, BEAUMONT, CHINON, FRANCE 1976 $40 $85 $21 1.9
NEBBIOLO BARTOLO MASCARELLO, BAROLO, ITALY 2004 $50 $136 $34 1.5
AR.PE.PE., ROCCE ROSSE, SASSELLA SUPERIORE RISERVA, VALTELLINA, ITALY 1999 $40 $63 $16 2.5
PRODUTTORI DEL BARBARESCO, BARBARESCO, ITALY 1985 $60 $78 $20 3.1
TEMPRANILLO LOPEZ DE HEREDIA, VIÑA BOSCONIA, GRAN RESERVA, RIOJA, SPAIN 1976 $110 $365 $91 1.2
MOURVÈDRE CHÂTEAU DE PIBARNON, BANDOL, FRANCE 1990 $65 $140** $35 1.9
SYRAH JAMET, CÔTE RÔTIE, FRANCE 2006 $50 $238 $60 0.8
JEAN-LOUIS CHAVE, HERMITAGE, FRANCE 2010 $120 $478 $120 1.0
CABERNET SAUVIGNON MAYACAMAS, NAPA VALLEY, CALIFORNIA 1986 $75 $172 $43 1.7
TENUTO SAN GUIDO, SASSICAIA, TUSCANY, ITALY 1999 $75 $230 $58 1.3

*Not on wine-searcher.com.
**Estimated from wine-searcher graph.

As you can see there are a couple of neat values here.  The Jean-Louis Chave is priced at just about “par” — a 1:1 ratio of NoMad to retail.  But you still have to drop $120 on a glass.  The other interesting option is the Jamet.  It is listed on wine-searcher at $238, though this is a recent price spike from a historical average of about $150.  So perhaps The NoMad stocked up on a few bottles of the Jamet before the jump and can afford to sell it basically at retail.  (The bottle goes for $250.  And although wine-searcher lists and average price of $238, the only place I found actually selling it had it for $375, though oddly they list it as a “future” even though it’s almost a decade old.)  I like Syrah generally, so I would probably spring for the Jamet if I were back.  I would avoid the Barbaresco, not just because of the 3-to-1 ratio but because $80 is a price I might reasonably pay for a bottle to drink at home (whereas I probably wouldn’t pay $300 or $500).  The Tempranillo looks like a good value, too, though I’m not sure I could make myself pay $110 for a glass.

So there you have it, my analysis of the reserve wines at The NoMad.  I’m going to see if I can put up a calculator on the website as well, so you can do some calculations for yourself if/when the wine lists change.

The NoMad’s list of reserve wines by the glass is below. (Return to the body of the post.)

NoMad’s Reserve Wines by the Glass

The NoMad — Reserve White Wines by the Glass

The NoMad (my reviews here, here (at the rooftop), and here) made news recently with its list of “reserve wines by the glass.”  The NoMad uses a high-tech system called a Coravin, which lets you pour a glass of wine out of a bottle without removing the cork.  As a result, the restaurant (or you, if you want to shell out a few hundred bucks) can serve wine by the glass without exposing the wine remaining in the bottle to oxygen.  That means The NoMad’s list of “reserve” wines by the glass includes lots of bottles you wouldn’t otherwise find — generally, bottles that have aged 10-15 years or more, and that would costs hundreds of dollars if you bought them by the bottle.   Continue reading

This guy is 103 and eats out at great restaurants every night.

Mr. Rosen is 103 but he doesn’t look a day over 90. His mother died at 53 and his father at 70, but he says he feels fine and has had no major operations or health problems.

He made a bundle with his office supply company and is spending it — $100 a night, on average — on dinners out.

Much of his work involved wooing clients over lunch and dinner, so after retiring a few years back because of hearing loss, he continued to put on a fine work suit every afternoon, grab his satchel, and head out to hail a yellow cab to one of his favorite restaurants. Café Boulud perhaps, on East 76th Street, or Boulud Sud near Lincoln Center, or Avra Estiatorio on East 48th Street.

“I haven’t eaten dinner home in many years,” said Mr. Rosen . . . .

NY Times, “A Nightly Dinner Out That’s Like Therapy”

I’ve reviewed some in-flight food options on this website recently — LAN’s Premium Business, American Airlines’s domestic first class, United Airlines BusinessElite to Hawaii — with more hopefully to come.  But I’ve never truly been impressed, even in first/business class or with celebrity chefs.  Why not?

The Points Guy tackles this question with the help of a science writer today:

At low elevations, the 10,000 or so taste buds in the human mouth work fairly normally, translating chemical signals into electrical signals and sending them to the brain. They work in conjunction with the sense of smell to parse different flavors, from sour to umami.

But here’s the rub: a plane’s artificial atmosphere is equivalent to being in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 7,000 feet above sea level. The altitude, combined with low humidity, puts the taste buds on the fritz. Scientists estimate that smell and taste decrease about 20-30% on planes.

SCIENCE!

Have you ever had airplane food you liked?  Is it uniformly terrible, even in premium cabins?

Where Have I Been?

Bermuda

Well, yes, I was recently in Bermuda, but that’s not the point of this post. While I was in Bermuda, I dropped my iPhone into the swimming pool at the hotel! The iPhone was shot (even though I immediately threw it in some rice) and with it, hundreds of pictures and notes! I had a bunch of restaurant reviews that I was planning to write, but alas, they are gone forever. So I’ve been spending some time regrouping, and will have some more posts up soon.  Stay tuned…

Happy New Year!

Welcome to 2013!  Hope everyone had a great New Year’s Eve — I’d been working nonstop, but got a major project finished the evening of the 31st, and was able to relax with friends for a few hours.  2012 was the blog’s first full year, and it was a great one, featuring one of the earliest reviews of a new restaurant, and a trip to a unique “restaurant within a restaurant“.  I went back to one of my favorite spots, which disappointed slightly, and I went to a place that fell short in the past, but struck a perfect chord this time around.  I went to a one-Michelin-star restaurant that I think is grossly underrated.  And of course, there were a range of other places, from vegetarian fast food in Williamsburg to haute cuisine in Hawaii to Taco Bell.  I finally launched “Frugal Fridays“, with a nice little lineup of less-expensive spots.

One of the great things about blogging is being able to share my thoughts on some fantastic restaurants and great food.  One of the challenges is that, once you write something, it’s out there.  With a view to keeping myself honest, here’s a look back at what I promised for 2012:

–Guest reviews from other cities (if you’re interested, drop a line to withoutbacon@gmail.com)  [VERDICT: FAIL.  No guest posts in 2012, though I have to say this was primarily because people who said they’d send in guest posts never did.  The offer is still open for anyone who’s interested, though!]

–”Frugal Fridays”:  occasional reviews of less-pricey restaurants.  (Going to Eleven Madison Park every day would be fun, but also bankrupting!) [VERDICT: SUCCESS!  Frugal Fridays has launched successfully.]

–”Steakhouse Roundup”:  what can you get when your carnivorous friends make you go to a steakhouse?  Look here to find out. [VERDICT: EPIC FAIL.  Nothing even close to this in 2012.  I wrote this because I had been to a steakhouse in late 2011, and I thought I could review the famous Hillstone veggie burger.  But I still haven’t been to Hillstone, and the post about the Union Trust steakhouse in Philly never came…] 

–”Home cooking”:  Some interesting vegetarian recipes that you can try out at home.  [VERDICT: EPIC FAIL.  I haven’t managed to post a single recipe!  Maybe in 2013…]

I don’t want to find myself writing “EPIC FAIL” at this point in 2014, so I won’t make specific promises about content this year.  But I will say that I was inspired by a friend’s New Year’s Resolution of posting on his blog at least once per week.  I’ve always aimed for a post a week, but I’m usually a bit off from that mark.  So for 2013, I’ll aim for 52 new reviews… (I can’t promise they’ll come exactly one per week, but an average of one per week seems pretty reasonable.)

And as always, stay connected to Without Bacon — sign up for new posts (on the right side), follow me on twitter, or drop a line to withoutbacon@gmail.com.  I’m always happy to hear your comments/criticism/ideas/random thoughts.  Happy new year!

 

Wha… I just… wow.

Presented without comment, from Gawker:

Pizza Hut's Latest Caloric Monstrosity is a Pizza with a Crust Made of Pizza Cones

Just when you thought you couldn’t get any fatter.

From the people who brought you theCheese Burger Crust Pizza comes yet another gastrointestinal holocaust sure to make your primary care physician a very rich person.

Introducing the new Cone Crust Pizza from Pizza Hut Middle East.

Already loaded with cheese and all your favorite toppings, the novelty pie comes complete with a crust made of mini-pizza cones. Each conical food-bullet is lovingly encrusted with Parmesan and stuffed with either a polyp of cream cheese, a wad of honey mustard chicken, or both.

Because it’s not quite a pizza until it comes with twelve extra pizzas.

Hakkasan’s Menu Looks Promising…

…for vegetarians.

If you’ve walked down 43rd Street between 8th and 9th Avenues in Manhattan, you may have noticed this foreboding doorway on the north side of the street (just past the 99-cent pizza place).  This is the doorway to the (in?)famous Hakkasan, a worldwide network of high-end Chinese restaurants.  The original, in London, has garnered a Michelin star.  But Pete Wells was much more critical, referring to “lunatic prices” — you can pay $888 for abalone tuna with truffles — and “food that is, in too many cases, about as interesting as a box of paper clips”.   Continue reading

Eat at Jean-Georges for Free!

Of course, there’s a catch.  There’s always a catch.

My wife and I recently signed up for the Chase British Airways credit card that offers (until June 7) a 100,000-point signup bonus.  But there’s also a nice little perk if you want to enjoy some fine dining in New York:  if you eat at a Michelin-starred restaurant between now and July 31, 2012, you’ll get a $50 statement credit after spending $50 at one restaurant, and a second $50 credit after spending $50 at a second restaurant.

This lends itself to some fun possibilities.  Tulsi, for example, offers a great vegetarian dinner tasting menu for just $65, or $15 after the credit.  Gramercy Tavern’s generally-pricey $98 vegetable tasting menu would be just $48 after this credit.  Of course what you really want is to eat at Jean-Georges for free.  Okay, here’s how:  two courses at Jean-Georges (which looks to have some good vegetarian options right now) are just $38 at lunch, so with tax and tip you’ll probably come in right around $50, making lunch free after the credit. (Remember, the total has to exceed $50 in order to get the credit.)

We received the card about a week or so after applying for it, so there’s still time to sign up in time to take advantage of this offer (and the signup bonus).

What do you think is the best way to take advantage of the $50 credit?